In order to login to helpdesk, please use your forum account.

Latest Updates
Jul
3
I2C 1-Wire click released
Posted by on 03 July 2015 09:20 PM
  I2C 1 Wire click carries DS2482, a “bridge” that performs bi-directional conversions between I2C masters and 1-Wire slave devices. The bridge joins two sets of pins. SCL and SDA pins on the mikroBUS™ connector, and eight independently operated 1-Wire I/Os. As far as 1-Wire clicks go, so far we released Unique ID click, Thermo 2 click and Expand 3 click. Of course you’re not limited to them. When a single wire is enough you can connect temperature sensors, EEPROM chips and similar components. Like in this video here: The example from the video is on Libstock. More details on the product page Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
Read more »



Jul
2
  The entire Arduino/Genuino conundrum has been filling news headlines for the better part of 2015, but makers are probably more interested in project ideas than in politics and court-room drama. Luckily, the Arduino Uno click shield and click boards are as neutral as Switzerland. Whether your particular Arduino board has been produced in New York, Italy or Shenzhen, you can make use of these examples. The first mini-project uses Arduino’s LED Control library to recreate Conway’s game of life with a pair of 8x8 clicks. It’s basically LED blinking with a marvellous mathematical twist. Starting from an initial pre-defined state and moving through successive time increments, each LED either lives or dies (turns on or off) depending on how many of the eight surrounding LEDs are on or off. The exact parameters dictate whether all LEDs will eventually turn off or whether they will evolve into a stable looping pattern. Obviously the example doesn’t have any practical use, but it’s fun and insightful to see how complex patterns emerge from a simple set of rules. Cellular automata models are fascinating stuff (if nothing else, it beats conventional LED blinking any day). Here's how it looks: For more practical-minded individuals, the Arduino rotating photo table might prove more interesting. It’s a hardware setup for creating 3D models of objects from photographs. A stepper click moves a disk on top, while a a relay click connected to the camera controls the shutter. And in this particular case, a thunder click serves as the model for generating the 3D render. The third project implements a DMX master using a RS485 click. It allows you to connect up to 32 devices on a single bus. If DMX controllers interest you, check out MINI32-based DMX controller, as well as the lighting click pack. The microcontroller-projects blog is high quality with code examples provided, and great photography too. It’s a good idea to bookmark it. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
Read more »



Jul
1
FlowPaw can now control LED strips
Posted by on 01 July 2015 02:04 PM
  The DSPRobotics development team added a new module to FlowStone, enhancing FlowPaw with LED strip control. Once you get hold of a 5V 60 addressable LED strip, all you have to do is connect it to the PWM pin on one of the four mikroBUS™ sockets, or claws (as they are known in FlowPaw lingo). Then drop the module and FlowStone and control the LEDs from there — the intensity, the colors, the pattern and so on. Another FlowPaw enhancement is StoneCloud (a name that has sort of a poetic ring to it). It’s the missing link that brings IoT to FlowPaw. Using a unique address which is created with the ID of the FlowPaw board, the StoneCloud lets you monitor and control your FlowPaw from anywhere in the world. And if by any remote chance, of all the places in the world, you found yourself at the Institute of Engineering Technology at Derby University last week, you could have seen the whole setup yourself. FlowPaw was presented there at the 2015 BigBang fair, in front of hundreds of teachers and students. According to Carl, “FlowPaw was popular as ever.” Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
Read more »



Jun
30
A short survey about newly released click boards
Posted by on 30 June 2015 02:45 PM
  As the click board count continues to climb it’s becoming increasingly difficult to keep in touch with all the new releases. You have to read more and more to stay in the loop. We recently started releasing new videos for each new click. Just short demos based on the accompanying Libstock examples, to give you a quick idea of what the board does. We’re also filling the backlog, adding videos for previous click boards. That said, we’re looking for more ideas, and your general impressions on what could we do differently in regard to announcements, videos, presenting key features, and documenting the Libstock examples. Click the link to fill out the survey, shouldn’t take long to answer. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
Read more »



Jun
29
SpeakUp API published on Libstock
Posted by on 29 June 2015 04:27 PM
  The SpeakUp API package contains everything you need to build your own software for configuring the speech recognition click board: DLL files, a C header file with necessary declarations, a simple example written in c++, and a help file with descriptions of interfaces and routines. Why would you want to build your own app when there already is one, available for free? It’s primarily useful if you’re implementing the speech recognition click board in a final product. Your own software tool can emphasize or de-emphasize certain aspects of SpeakUp’s hardware. For example, consider our Let’s make project with voice-controlled chess. Using this API you could create a chess-specific SpeakUp configuration tool, with an interface that clearly references which row or column on the chess board is which UART index. That would eliminate the need for any sort of additional instructions which would be necessary if one used the default SpeakUp app. Ever since we launched SpeakUp it has been one of the most popular click boards. Hopefully, with this API it will become even more useful for existing and future owners. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
Read more »




Copyright © MikroElektronika. All rights reserved. All trade and/or services marks mentioned are the property of their respective owners.