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Latest Updates
Feb
5
How to win at line follower competitions with the Buggy
Posted by on 05 February 2016 09:32 PM
  First he showed us how to run the Buggy on Arduino code. Then he explained how to turn it into an obstacle avoiding robot. Now, Teo from the microcontroller projects blog built a Line-follower car out of our four wheeled development platform. Out of the three, this one modifies the Buggy the most. Without going into too much detail, we'll just say that the project involves a third party line follower sensor and a bespoke wooden spacer. The spacer Teo built is quite representable. But there are many ways you can go about it. To remind you, this is not the first time we've seen the Buggy customized. In any case, the spacer you must figure out yourself. The code you can pretty much copy paste from the Microcontroller-projects blog. But best go through it line by line, to find a way to improve it. Just in case you run into Teo on a Line Follower competition. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
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Feb
4
click boards are for the children! Introducing BrainPad
Posted by on 04 February 2016 05:43 PM
  People of a certain generation are expected to know how to replace fuses or even do elementary repairs on a washing machine. It's either your father or your grandfather, or maybe you yourself, sir. When today's kids grow up, however, they will probably live in a world where it's expected that one knows a little bit of C#. If for nothing else, at least to know how to do some elementary debugging around the house.   BrainPad from GHI Electronics is the latest offering in tools that aim to teach children how to code. It's an ARM-based development board with illustrative silkscreen drawings that show the main MCU as a brain, and various peripherals connected to it. A metaphor any kid can relate to. Of course, children have short attention spans and crave for a steady supply of novelty. To keep young minds interested, BrainPad cleverly implements a mikroBUS™ socket. Click boards are like Lego blocks, and there's endless discovery and experimentation to do with the many available boards. The board comes in two versions. One is for C#, with Microsoft's .NET Micro Framework (similar to Quail), while the other is for C++, compatible with Arduino software (similar to Flip & click). Apart from the vivid silkscreen design, the board is of interest to educators because of the extensive documentation it comes with it. The GHI Electronics web page has several tutorials, divided by age groups of the intended reader. Get your kid a BrainPad, and your grandkid will have someone to rely on to do some basic programming chores around the smart home of the future. Or even something more. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
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Feb
4
click boards are for the children! Introducing Brain Pad
Posted by on 04 February 2016 05:43 PM
  People of a certain generation are expected to know how to replace fuses or even do elementary repairs on a washing machine. It's either your father or your grandfather, or maybe you yourself, sir. When today's kids grow up, however, they will probably live in a world where its expected that you know a little bit of C#. If for nothing else, at least to know to do some elementary debugging around the house.   Brainpad from GHI Electronics is the latest offering in tools that aim to teach children how to code. It's an ARM-based development board with illustrative silkscreen drawings that show the main MCU as a brain, and various peripherals connected to it. A metaphor any kid can relate to. Of course, children have short attention spans and crave for a steady supply of novelty. To keep young minds interested, Brain Pad cleverly implements a mikroBUS™ socket. Click boards are like Lego blocks, and there's endless discovery and experimentation to do with the many available boards. The board comes in two versions. One is for C#, with Microsoft's .NET Micro Framework (similar to Quail), while the other is for C++, compatible with Arduino software (similar to Flip & click). Apart from the vivid silkscreen design, the board is of interest to educators because of the extensive documentation it comes with it. The GHI Electronics web page has several tutorials, divided by age groups of the intended reader. Get your kid a Brainpad, and your grandkid will have someone to rely on to do some basic programming chores around the smart home of the future. Or even something more. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
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Feb
3
  IR Gesture click carries a chip that is based on the same technology used in conventional proximity and ambient light sensors: an infrared transmitter paired with a receiver that catches rays bouncing off an object. But there's a twist. The receiving end of the infrared loop is consisted of four photodiodes instead of one. Because of that, the APDS-9960 aboard IR gesture click has more data to work with. Enough for an integrated gesture engine to infer the position, speed and direction of objects moving above it (in most cases, a hand). It can do basic gestures like one-directional swipes: up, down, left or right; but you can also configure it to recognize more complex manoeuvres. At the same time, however, it can still perform as an ambient light or proximity sensor – so you can configure it to automatically wake up only when you get your hand close by. You can see more details on the product page, as well as explore the Libstock library. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
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Feb
2
  We are reviewing our click board documentation files. A redesign is pending. It only makes sense to ask people who use the product on what can be improved. Whether you are a power user, a click board addict, or someone who just had a cursory glance at the manuals, your feedback on the documentation supplied with clicks would be appreciated. Not to take too much time from you, the survey is extremely short, but we're leaving room for those who want to elaborate more. Be certain that we will read each and every response. Looking forward to your feedback. Yours sincerely,MikroElektronika
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